Posts Tagged studio musicians

IT’S ALL HOW YOU LOOK AT IT

I guess when you’re driving a round speaker, it doesn’t matter what shape the cabinet is really – but I’m just used to seeing big square / rectangular stacks and these triangles are a little different. JPH

I agree with JP, after 30 plus years in the business looking at the same square boxes, it is a little hard to get used to, but, if it plays, it plays.  Check out these 3rd Power Amplification Systems

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY ELECTRIC GUITAR!

This is exciting!  Today is the birthday of the electric guitar!  Don’t take it for granted and keep on playing!

Read about it  here.

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EVER WONDER WHERE ROCK AND ROLL CAME FROM?

I am a huge history buff and that includes anything to do with music, of course.  I really liked reading this article because it breaks down the history of Rock and Roll in a way even a non musician can enjoy.

The history of Rock and Roll

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THINK YOU HAVE NO TIME TO PRACTICE YOUR GUITAR?

Here’s a nice little article that may help you plan your guitar or other instrument practice.  I  hope everyone had a great weekend!

Finding time to practice

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THE NASHVILLE NUMBER SYSTEM

A few of my advanced students have dreams of working in Nashville as studio musicians. Nashville uses a method called the Nashville Number System. The Nashville Number System is a shorthand method of writing musical arrangements that was developed by Nashville studio musicians based on the degrees of the scale (do, re, me, fa, sol, la, ti ..). It is a powerful tool in the written communication of music.

I am starting to teach this method which is well known in the recording industry. The Beatles, during a recording session in England, hired a Nashville pianist and asked if he wanted them to play the song for him to become familiar with it. The pianist looked at their arrangement and started jotting down notes. The Fab Four noticed that the pianist was jotting down numbers instead of chord changes and notes. To their surprise, he told them he was ready to record. He played it through the first time perfectly. The pianist was using the Nashville Number System.

Recording time is very expensive and this method cuts down on costs significantly. I am anxious to see how my students take to this method.

Rick

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